Are You:

Are you tired of ..........

· Feeling like no one is fighting for working people?

· Ceos taking all our money?

· Corporations shipping our jobs out of the country?

· Companies escaping THEIR tax burden?

· Having no health care?

· Health care costs killing you?

· Making an economic decision to not utilize your Health Care?

· Having no retirement?

· Big business getting so big it seems to control everything?

· Gas prices with record profits for oil companies?

· Your hard work being exploited by a company?

· The banks exploiting the average hard working American?

· Being afraid to ask for a raise?

· The cost of living rising faster than your wages?

· Being laid off?

· Being over qualified for your job because you can't find a better paying one?

· Living pay check to pay check?

· Working in fear?



Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Cantor: Taxing The Rich Is Off The Table, But Making Students Pay More Immediately Is Fine


One of the major demands that almost all congressional Republicans have made about deficit reduction is that wealthier Americans and large corporations shouldn’t have to pay any more in taxes. “The House has taken a firm position against anything having to do with increasing taxes or raising tax rates,” said House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) at the onset of negotiations over the budget deficit in May.

Yet as the Daily Beast’s Howard Kurtz reports, one group that Cantor is apparently fine with making pay more is American college students. Cantor, at the White House for budget negotiations, apparently proposed that students who take out student loans should immediately start paying interest, rather than getting to make payments after graduation:

As Monday’s White House budget talks got down to the nitty-gritty, Eric Cantor proposed a series of spending cuts, one of them aimed squarely at college students. The House majority leader, who did most of the talking for the Republican side, said those taking out student loans should start paying interest right away, rather than being able to defer payments until after graduation. It is a big-ticket item that would save $40 billion over 10 years.

According to Kurtz, Obama rejected Cantor’s proposal out of hand, saying that he didn’t want to “screw students.” Cantor’s proposal comes at a time when American students are already overwhelmed by student loan debt. In 2008, the average debt that a college student graduated with was a whopping $23,000. American students continue to pay more than most of their developed world neighbors for a college education, and Cantor apparently wants to make it even more difficult for them while not touching the richest Americans.

9 comments:

  1. The Cal State system just approved a 12% increase in tuition cost. The tuition costs have been increasing for the past 8 years. WTF! How are we suppose to better our selfs when we can't even afford to attend one semester.

    ReplyDelete