Are You:

Are you tired of ..........

· Feeling like no one is fighting for working people?

· Ceos taking all our money?

· Corporations shipping our jobs out of the country?

· Companies escaping THEIR tax burden?

· Having no health care?

· Health care costs killing you?

· Making an economic decision to not utilize your Health Care?

· Having no retirement?

· Big business getting so big it seems to control everything?

· Gas prices with record profits for oil companies?

· Your hard work being exploited by a company?

· The banks exploiting the average hard working American?

· Being afraid to ask for a raise?

· The cost of living rising faster than your wages?

· Being laid off?

· Being over qualified for your job because you can't find a better paying one?

· Living pay check to pay check?

· Working in fear?



Friday, October 28, 2011

Mayor Jean Quan's Statement to Occupy Oakland.

Sounds like she's back peddeling from her original statement.

quan_statement

I wonder what the Oakland Police are afraid of?

Occupy Oakland Police Brutality YouTube videos stay after police demands to delete

Google has today updated a transparency report which in part very suggestively points toward the videos you may have encountered over the past 24 hours that document an apparent set of police brutality cases taking place during the Occupy Oakland events of October 2011.  Apparently they’ve had requests and/or demands from law enforcement agencies to take down videos of the same nature as the videos in question for fear that they would “defame” law enforcement officials. Google has decidedly refused in the past, and due to their promotion of such a stance this week, seems quite likely to be refusing again for the events at Occupy Oakland. The reason this bit of content is a Column instead of your everyday average post is that it contains a bit more conjecture than your average news story – aka you’re with me now, ladies and gentlemen, so see if you agree.

Thursday, October 27, 2011

Here is a list of Companies that have moved "Off-Shore" or out-sourced labor

So you think Free Trade and Tax Shelter don't cost American Jobs??
American Jobs. This list comes from Lou Dobbs as he is not happy about this trend of us losing such a huge Tax Base not to mention JOBS

Here are companies gone out of the USA or outsourced some of it's services.

3Com
3M

A
Accenture
Adaptec
ADC
Adobe Systems
Advanced Energy Industries
Aetna
Affiliated Computer Services
A.G. Edwards
Agere Systems
Agilent Tech.
AIG
Alamo Rent A Car
Albertson's
Allen Systems Group
Alliance Semiconductor
Allstate
Alpha Thought Global
Amazon.com
AMD
American Express
American Household
American Management Systems
American Standard
Amphenol Corp.
Analog Devices
Andrew Corp.
Anheuser-Busch
MORE

Is This The Beginning Of A Nation Wide General Strike??

GENERAL STRIKE & MASS DAY OF ACTION – NOVEMBER 2
Below is the proposal passed by the Occupy Oakland General Assembly on Wednesday October 26, 2011 in reclaimed Oscar Grant Plaza. 1607 people voted. 1484 voted in favor of the resolution, 77 abstained and 46 voted against it, passing the proposal at 96.9%. The General Assembly operates on a modified consensus process that passes proposals with 90% in favor and with abstaining votes removed from the final count.
PROPOSAL:
We as fellow occupiers of Oscar Grant Plaza propose that on Wednesday November 2, 2011, we liberate Oakland and shut down the 1%.
We propose a city wide general strike and we propose we invite all students to walk out of school. Instead of workers going to work and students going to school, the people will converge on downtown Oakland to shut down the city.
All banks and corporations should close down for the day or we will march on them.
While we are calling for a general strike, we are also calling for much more. People who organize out of their neighborhoods, schools, community organizations, affinity groups, workplaces and families are encouraged to self organize in a way that allows them to participate in shutting down the city in whatever manner they are comfortable with and capable of.
The whole world is watching Oakland. Let’s show them what is possible.
The Strike Coordinating Council will begin meeting everyday at 5pm in Oscar Grant Plaza before the daily General Assembly at 7pm. All strike participants are invited. Stay tuned for much more information and see you next Wednesday.

Bernie Sanders Says Deregulation Of Wall Street Is What Pushed Us Into This Recession

Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Labor Union Protests with Occupy Wall Street

Labor leaders have quickly joined the current crop of protestors in New York and other cities.

Oakland Policeman Throws Flash Grenade Into Crowd Trying To Help Injured Protester

Police arrested protesters early Wednesday at Woodruff Park, home of the Occupy Atlanta movement.

Protesters had been ordered to leave the park. Those waiting to be arrested were sitting in a circle with their arms locked. Police starting handcuffing them with plastic handcuffs around 12:45 a.m. Many protesters would not get up on their own and some had to be dragged. Most protesters went peacefully.
Some of the people waiting to be arrested waved small American flags. About 40 to 50 people remained inside the park after midnight, including Sen. Vincent Fort (D-Atlanta), former Atlanta city councilman Derrick Boazman and Joe Beasley, the southern regional director of the Rainbow PUSH Coalition. Several hundred others were in the street, chanting and carrying signs. Fort was arrested around 1 a.m.

Gov. Chris Christie’s Budget Cuts Put 4,000 New Jersey Police Officers Out Of A Job

By Tanya Somanader on Oct 25, 2011 at 1:50 pm
In the name of “no taxes,” Republicans have slashed state budgets across the country, forcing schools to sell advertising space, firefighters to lose their jobs to prison labor, and cities to decriminalize domestic violence in order to save money.

In New Jersey, Gov. Chris Christie (R) instituted severe cuts to education funding, public employee benefits, and public sector jobs, while calling his action the “day of reckoning.” Christie cut $3 billion in his first two years, leaving low-income New Jerseyans with half the number of legal aid lawyers, the mentally ill without a home after a hospital had to shut down, and thousands of women without health clinics to visit. Those cuts have also left 4,000 New Jersey police officers without a job and left drug-related crime to flourish:


In Newark, police no longer respond to motor vehicle accidents without injuries. In Paterson, the police department’s Narcotics Squad was cut by half.

In Newark, 162 officers were laid off; in Camden, 167; Trenton, 105. [...]

Statewide, about 4,000 police officers have lost their jobs in the past two years, said Anthony Wieners, president of the state’s Policemen’s Benevolent Association. There were about 25,900 municipal police officers in New Jersey in 2009, according to State Police statistics.

“All the advancements we made since the late 1970s, in community policing, getting out into the communities and building a trust, are going to be lost,” Wieners said.

In Little Egg, the police department had to disband its drug unit after 11 of the town’s 49 cops were laid off last year. In the six months that followed the layoffs, “burglaries in the township jumped 61 percent, assaults rose 22 percent, and larceny increased 54 percent.”

Christie’s “day of reckoning” has fallen hard on low-income New Jerseyans and public servants. But, thanks to Christie, the reckoning never reached the state’s millionaires. Last year, the state legislature passed a tax on millionaires that would help alleviate Christie’s budget cuts. Christie vetoed it — twice. In under two minutes flat. His argument: A tax increase is a “failed, irresponsible” policy that will “set our economy further back from recovery.” But it’s hard to see how his current policies are doing anything different.

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Oakland Police Beat a Woman at Occupy Oakland Raid 10-25-11

After police moved a metal barricade onto a woman's foot she asked them to move it off, she asked them twice. They refused to move it so she pushed on the barricade to free her foot. When she did that the cops went crazy grabbing for her and started beating on her. Another cop shouted "grab them" and cops just started reaching, pushing and hitting anyone in their reach. They got one other woman and started beating on her. You are hear the woman in the background screaming as they drag her across the concrete and continue to hit her with their fists and night sticks.

Real Cost of Teacher Layoffs is Our Future

By now, the pattern is impossible to ignore: More than 30,000 teachers in California received layoff warnings last spring; another 300 prepared for unemployment in Milwaukee; in Chicago, 1,000 more were looking for work, and by the time school started in September some 60,000 teachers across the country had lost their jobs.
Laid-off public-school teacher Natalie Barmore, right, files for unemployment benefits online at a job fair last week in Detroit. (AP Photo/PAUL SANCYA )
Certain ramifications are obvious: Fewer teachers equals larger classes and less attention devoted to each student, even as the demand for improved outcomes mounts.
“No child left behind?” sighed Anselmo Feliciano, whose class list increased by more than 50 percent this year. “Kids are being literally left behind because there are so many of them. When we walk down the halls the lines are so, so long.”
Feliciano teaches at Lafayette Elementary School in Long Beach, Calif., where 100 percent of the students – almost all of them Latino or African-American – are considered “socioeconomically disadvantaged” and, therefore, eligible for free or reduced price lunches. Yet the school lost a third of its teaching staff this year.
Although data on the effect of increased class sizes remains inconclusive, research on what it takes to teach disadvantaged children is not: “What we know about educating poor kids is that it takes more money than it does for affluent children,” said Anne Foster, a longtime school board member in Texas and now executive director at the education advocacy group Parents for Public Schools.
Poor families move more frequently, and their children often come to school hungry. Foster noted that kids living in poverty start school with about half as many words in their vocabulary as their middle-class counterparts. “It takes time – and money – to overcome the deficits,” she said, noting that early language skills affect reading, intellectual development and future academic success. “So that’s really one of the worst effects here – on poor children.”
Some of the less apparent results of school layoffs could be at least as damaging. Thousands of jobless teachers – and their kids — no longer have health insurance. Many are in their 30s and 40s, traditionally the prime years for earning money toward retirement. But not now.
A Chicago study found that of teachers who lost jobs there this year, a plurality were African-American and working in low-income schools. In Long Beach, Calif., where some 400 teachers are out of work, educators with master’s degrees are losing their homes. They worry about driving to the grocery store because of the gas required. Meanwhile in Texas, the state legislature recently slashed $4 billion from education funding.
“Back when I started, teaching was considered an important job,” said Jane Gordon-Topper, 56, who teaches kindergarten in California. “I’m not sure that it’s seen that way today.”
Across the country, as each state grapples with its own dire budget scenario, education funding has been among the first areas cut, just as taxpayers are demanding improved test scores and graduation rates. That disconnect – less money for better performance – is leading veteran educators to question whether voters still consider public schools essential to American democracy.

California prison guards face layoffs

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (KGO) -- It is an anxious time for California prison guards. Thousands are going to be laid off because of the economy and the decision to transfer more inmates into county control.

The massive layoff warning is unusual under a Democratic governor. The prison guards' union is one of the most powerful groups in Sacramento, almost always getting what it wants. But a budget crisis and a court order are more powerful.
"Ultimately, will we be able to save every single person from being impacted by the layoff? I doubt it," California Corrections Office of Personnel spokesperson Robert Downs said.
Due to labor laws and union contracts, warning notices have to be given at least 120 days in advance of an actual layoff. It gives workers an opportunity to transfer or be demoted.

While the layoffs affect almost every job category, prison guards are likely to be affected the most since they are half of the agency's 65,000 workforce.

It's unclear how many of the 26,000 Corrections workers will ultimately lose their jobs since the inmate shift has never been tried before.

Many workers were reluctant to speak to ABC7 because they thought it could hurt their chances in finding other position, but the prison guards union thinks the move is unreasonable.

"It is very difficult for a lot of folks to relocate; most people are underwater with their homes, to sell a house you can't even get out from under and go drag your kids out of schools and move across the state, it's a big deal," California Correctional Peace Officers Association spokesperson Ryan Sherman said.

Groups pushing to lower prison spending think it's time to spend the $10 billion annual corrections budget on something else.

"We are in a budget crisis; now is the moment in California that we need to really shift our thinking and move the resources into what people really need," Californians for a Responsible Budget spokesperson Emily Harris said.

There could be more waves of layoff warnings.

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation is churning out 26,000 layoff warning notices by the end of the week. It's the result of Gov. Jerry Brown's plan that began sentencing some low-level inmates this month to county jails instead of state prison. The move aims to relieve overcrowding as the courts ordered and save the state money.

Monday, October 24, 2011

Everything The Media Told You About Occupy Wall Street Is Wrong

After 10 days out of town, I finally made it to Occupy Wall Street on Tuesday and had a chance to see for myself what's going on. My conclusion: almost everything the media told me about the protest is wrong.
2011-10-20-IMG_0100.JPG
Based on my observations, here's what I consider the Top Ten Myths About Occupy Wall Street.
Myth #1. The Movement Is Violent.
2011-10-19-IMG_0101.JPG
One of the most striking images I witnessed at the demonstration was a young black man holding a sign that read "End NYPD Violence!" in front of a group of police officers.
The officers quickly challenged his accusation. But the young man didn't leave. Next, the police turned away and ignored him. But he still didn't leave. Then the officers chuckled and let out an unexpected laugh when they realized the man wasn't going away. The scene was confrontational, but definitely not violent.
In fact, one of the first things I noticed was a sign posted on a wall that embraced "Kingian Nonviolence," the peaceful principles that guided Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Principles of Kingian Nonviolence
Myth #2. It's Just A Bunch Of Pampered Kids.
Although I supported the concept of the Occupy Wall Street movement when I first heard of it, I admit I didn't think the group had much to offer me. From what I could see in the media, they were well-educated, well-intentioned young white people, but they didn't really represent me.
I was wrong.
What I found was a wide-ranging group of people from various backgrounds, young and old, male and female, black, white, Latin, Asian and mixed. It was the essence of New York, the reason why I moved to this city 10 years ago.
2011-10-19-IMG_0054B.JPG
Myth #3. There Are No Black People Involved.
I was taken aback by how many black and Latino participants I noticed at the demonstration. I hadn't seen them on the television coverage of the movement, but they were clearly there.
2011-10-19-IMG_0105.JPG
2011-10-19-IMG_0087.JPG
Myth #4. They're Anti-American.
In my experience, I saw a lot of American flags being waved proudly at the demonstration. The protesters may not all think the same things, but many of them were clearly hoping America would live up to its promise as a land of opportunity where the rules are fair and all are welcome.
2011-10-19-IMG_0094.JPG
Myth #5. They're Just Modern-Day Hippies.
To watch some of the media coverage of the movement, you would think the protest was filled with long-haired hippies left over from the 1960s. In fact, from my experience, I saw a few people who might fit this description, but I also saw just about every type of person you could imagine at the demonstration.
2011-10-19-IMG_0097.JPG
There were high school-aged kids with their parents, college students in their school sweatshirts, men in business suits, mothers with baby carriages, people with jobs, people who were unemployed, white-haired retirees, African drummers, rhythmic dancers, and one person who appeared to be wearing pajamas.
Myth #6. They Don't Know What They Want.
2011-10-19-IMG_0033.JPG
I found many different people gathered in Zuccotti Park with many different interests and agendas, but they seem to be unified by one common purpose. They're tired of a system that seems only to cater to the rich and powerful while ignoring the concerns of the vast majority of Americans.
2011-10-19-IMG_0044.JPG
Myth #7. The Labor Unions Are Behind This.
2011-10-19-IMG_0071.JPG
I saw only one labor union table at the demonstration, but most of the people seemed to have no connection to organized labor. Even if they had, there's nothing wrong with that. Labor unions are an important part of our country, and while not perfect, they've helped throughout history to improve working conditions for millions of Americans.
Myth #8. They're Pro-Obama. They're Anti-Obama.
"I don't have facts to back this up," Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain said in an interview recently, "but I happen to believe that these demonstrations are planned and orchestrated to distract from the failed policies of the Obama administration." That seems unlikely.
2011-10-19-ows2pics.jpg
Not long after I arrived I found a Hispanic man in a camouflage jacket complaining about Obama to a small crowd of onlookers. "Obama is not the savior," he cried out. Moments after he finished, a young black man in a sweat jacket stood up to defend Obama to the crowd, acknowledging that the president wasn't perfect but he was doing the best job he could to clean up the mess he had inherited.
Both sides had their points to make and both were respectfully acknowledged.
Myth #9. They're In The Wrong Place.
2011-10-19-99percenters.jpg
I love to hear conservatives complaining that the protesters should be in Washington instead of Wall Street, as if the conservatives were really concerned about the most effective way for the demonstrators to make their case.
This location-based argument suggests a limiting "either/or" mentality that you can't be in both places, and also assumes that there's no reason to be on Wall Street at all.
As Herman Cain said recently, "Don't blame Wall Street. Don't blame the big banks. If you don't have a job and you're not rich, blame yourself.
But there's a good reason why Wall Street serves as an ideal venue for the demonstration. Unlike politicians in Washington, who have to answer to voters every few years, corporate executives on Wall Street don't have to answer to the public, even though their actions have a huge impact on all of us. It seems to me, the protesters picked a reasonable venue to launch their movement. In fact, judging by the row of satellite trucks parked outside the protest, I'd say Wall Street was exactly the right place to draw attention to their cause.
2011-10-19-IMG_0107.JPG
Myth #10. They're Taking Over Wall Street.
I've lived in New York City for 10 years, but I'd never been to Zuccotti Park until the Occupy Wall Street protests took place. I assumed the protesters were camped out at a park somewhere at the end of Wall Street, throwing around garbage and creating a mess.
Once again, I was wrong.
First, the group was clean, neat and orderly when I saw them. The park was actually cleaner than any park I've ever seen in New York City. Some demonstrators even walked around with brooms to clean up any mess that might have been left, and signs were posted advising the occupiers to observe a "good neighbor policy."
2011-10-19-IMG_0037.JPG
Finally, as it turns out, Zuccotti Park isn't even on Wall Street. It's a couple blocks away. As you can see from the image below, the only mess on Wall Street came from the police horses standing guard in front of the New York Stock Exchange.
2011-10-19-IMG_0109.JPG

Source Link

War profiteers escalate their war on jobs

Where Does #OccupyWallStreet Go From Here?

“On the one-month anniversary of Occupy Wall Street, I went to Liberty Plaza to find out where the movement will go next. I found a feeling of optimism that was so incredibly inspiring.” –Ed David, director.



Friday, October 21, 2011

Verizon workers to join Occupy Wall Street protest


Disgruntled Verizon Communications and Verizon Wireless workers and members of the labor union Communications Workers of America will be joining the "Occupy Wall Street" protest Friday in protest of "Verizon's corporate greed."

Obama Will Sign Free Trade Agreements Friday. What is your position?

President Barack Obama will sign Free Trade agreements with South Korea, Panama and Colombia Friday, according to the White House.
The agreements were passed through Congress last week in a rare example of bipartisanship.
In addition to the three FTAs, the President will renew the Trade Adjustment Assistance program, which provides American workers at risk from the agreements $575 million in benefits for fiscal years 2012 and 2013.
After signing the agreements, the President will deliver remarks from the Rose Garden.

Occupy More: OWS roughed-up by NYPD

A new wave of protests erupts in New York as Anti-Wall Street activists accuse the city's police of using excessive force. Hundreds of people have been arrested during the 5-week-long nationwide protests, as police were condemned for using pepper-spray. RT's Lucy Kafanov has been following the demonstrations.

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Data on income gains support 99ers’ gripes,

The Occupy Wall Street protesters claiming to represent the “99 percent” of Americans left behind economically can back up their claims with economic data. In the long period before the most recent recession, from 1979 to 2007, inflation-adjusted incomes of the top 1 percent of households increased 224 percent. Those even better off, the top 0.1 percent (the top one one-thousandth of households), saw their incomes grow 390 percent. In contrast, incomes for the bottom 90 percent grew just 5 percent between 1979 and 2007. All of that income growth, however, occurred in the unusually strong growth period from 1997 to 2000, which was followed by a fall in income from 2000 to 2007.

What's Wrong With Wall Street And Today's GOP In One Picture



Four GOP Party Leaders, Two Minutes, And One Gigantic Back Pedal

Watch them flip-flop when they realize the messages from #OccupyWallStreet resonate with so many people.


Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Stop Using credit/debit cards from big banks Nov. 11th, Close your accounte Nov 12th.

OCCUPY | WITHDRAW YOUR MONEY FROM THE BANKSTERS!!!


CLICK HERE TO READ IN FULL, TWEET, FB, ETC.

VETERAN'S DAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2011 STOP USING BIG BANK CREDIT/DEBIT CARDS

ON NOVEMBER 12, 2011 CLOSE YOUR ACCOUNTS WITH THE BANKSTERS!!!

THIS SIMPLE ACT WILL SEND A CLEAR MESSAGE TO THE THUGS THAT HAVE LOOTED OUR COUNTRY AND WHO DO NOT CARE ABOUT US, THE 99%



VOTE WITH YOUR MONEY!!!
VOTE WITH YOUR FEET!!!

OCCUPY | WITHDRAW IS ON
You are the revolution!!!

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO GET UPDATES
WHICH ARE COMING SOON

Poll: Americans Overwhemingly Support First Piece Of Obama Jobs Plan To Prevent Teacher, Firefighter Layoffs

Last week, two Senate Democrats joined Senate Republicans to filubuster President Obama’s jobs plan, even though analysts have found that it could add 1.9 million jobs next year. Now, Democratic lawmakers have decided to introduce Obama’s plan piece-by-piece, beginning with Obama’s $35 billion aid package “to help state and local governments provide funding for teachers, police officers and firefighters” that would create or save about 400,000 jobs.
The first measure will be well received by the public, as a new CNN poll found that, for the past two months, about 75 percent of the American people support this measure:
The poll also shows that 72 percent support increasing federal spending for roads, bridges, and schools; 60 percent support increasing federal aid to the unemployed; and 76 percent support increasing the tax rate of those who make more than one million dollars a year — all positions that Republicans are dead set against. “I’ll bring this bill for a vote as soon as possible,” Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) said today.

Occupy Wall Street shows muscle, raises $300K

NEW YORK — The Occupy Wall Street movement has close to $300,000, as well as storage space loaded with donated supplies in lower Manhattan. It stared down city officials to hang on to its makeshift headquarters, showed its muscle Saturday with a big Times Square demonstration and found legions of activists demonstrating in solidarity across the country and around the world.

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

Big Banks Refuse to Let People Close Accounts. NOVEMBER 5th is "Bank Transfer Day"

Big Banks Try to Stop Customers From Moving Their Money

I’ve long supported the campaign to “Move Your Money” from the giant, insolvent banks who take billions in bailouts and use the money to speculate and to corrupt the system to smaller banks. See this and this.
The Occupy Wall Street protesters have announced that November 5th is “Bank Transfer Day”, a targeted day to “Move Your Money”.
The big banks are trying to preempt the efforts of their customers to move their money to smaller banks.
This week, protesters were arrested when they tried to close their Citibank accounts:



And a Bank of American branch in Santa Cruz refused to let protesters close their accounts, saying they could not be protesters and customers at the same time:



In August, Bank of America used police (and reportedly swat teams) to stop St. Louis Bank of America customers from closing their accounts:



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CANTOR TO GIVE SPEECH ON INCOME INEQUALITY AND ‘HOW WE MAKE SURE THE PEOPLE AT THE TOP STAY THERE’

As the 99 percent movement protests spread across the globe, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) finally agreed yesterday that “there is too much income disparity” in the U.S. and determined that the government should rely on America’s wealthy to take care of this “complaint.” Continuing this theme, Cantor announced today that he will give an address on income disparity “and how Republicans believe the government could help fix it” on Friday. According to his aide, Cantor will specifically focus on how Washington can help “a single working mom…a small business owner..and how we make sure the people at the top stay there.” Of course, with the continued preferential tax treatment the nation’s wealthy are receiving from House Republicans, it doesn’t seem like they’ll have a problem staying at the top at the expense of the middle class.

Monday, October 17, 2011

Obama Goes All-in With 'Occupy Wall Street'

President Barack Obama will seek to tap into public anger at Wall Street excess to turn up the heat on congressional Republicans as he embarks on a campaign-style bus tour Monday to rally support for his stalled jobs package.
Hitting the road for the next three days, Obama heads to North Carolina and Virginia, both vital to his 2012 re-election chances, with an increasingly populist approach aimed at winning passage of at least parts of his $447 billion jobs plan.

His visits to two pivotal Southern states come against the backdrop of protests against corporate greed and economic inequality that began weeks ago in New York and have spread to other cities, inspiring global "Day of Rage" demonstrations against the world financial system over the weekend.

Obama -- whose poll numbers have fallen over his handling of the stagnant economy and high unemployment -- has voiced sympathy with the grievances of the "Occupy Wall Street" movement but has done so cautiously, not least because of his own economic team's ties to the financial industry.

"The president will continue to acknowledge the frustration that he himself shares about the need for Washington to do more to support our economic recovery and to ensure that the interest of the 99 percent of Americans is well-represented," spokesman Josh Earnest said when asked whether Obama would offer a message for Wall Street protesters on his trip south.

The Democratic president wants to step up the pressure on Republicans as he tries to push through his jobs package piece by piece, starting this week after his full plan went down to defeat in Congress last week.

With election races looming, Obama's strategy is to force Republicans to give ground or be painted as obstructionists more interested in shielding "millionaires and billionaires" -- "the 1 percent" -- from paying their fair share of taxes.

Republicans say Obama's original package was laden with wasteful spending and job-killing tax hikes for wealthy Americans. They have accused him of demonizing them and promoting "class warfare" instead of working with them to find areas of agreement.

In the Republicans' weekend radio address, Representative Kevin McCarthy urged Obama to "come off the campaign trail and get to work."

The deadlock over the jobs bill has raised concerns that political dysfunction in Washington will prevent any major steps to spur hiring before the November 2012 elections.

Early reports from Occupy Day of Action

From coast to coast, reports are starting to filter in on Occupy Wall Street’s massive day of action. Here’s a quick taste.
Knots of people began gathering Portland, Maine this morning:

At Occupy St. Louis last night, over one thousand people assembled on short notice on Kiener Plaza and marched on Bank of America.



And on the West Coast, several hundred marched this morning in Los Angeles against Wall Street greed.

Photo used under a Creative Commons license from Flickr user Neon Tommy

This is just the tip of the iceberg.

find out more

Sunday, October 16, 2011

OCCUPY WALL STREET VICTORY: The people have prevailed, gear up for global day of action



People power triumphs over Wall Street’s bid to end the protests mayor bloomberg and Brookfield Inc. back down on eviction world prepares for day of action Saturday October 15 in 950+ cities in 82 countries. We Are Winning!

Friday, October 14, 2011

Occupy Redlands Saturday Oct, 15

 This was a message sent to facebook, I'm posting it here.  If you can attend please do so.


Occupy Relands is having a march this Sat at 12noon in downtown Redlands corner of 5th and Relands Blvd.We need some Teamster/Union representation and I'm all they got(I'm retired) and they would like to reach out to Locals. Told them I'd contact you. Let me know if you can make it,we could use you're help.Thanks,
Michael Wasbotten,retired Stater Bros

Occupy Together Meet Ups. Find your local meet up and join the fight.

Occupy Wall Street has sparked a world wide movement known as Occupy Together.  Click on the link to see when and where portests are being formed.

Occupy Together

Let them know how you feel!!! Senate and House of Represenatives Links

Feel free to contact your elected officials regarding important issues that affect you the Taxpayer. I'm sure they all would love to hear from you.

U.S. Senate: Senators Home

Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives Member Telephone Directory

Thursday, October 13, 2011

EMERGENCY CALL TO ACTION: Keep Bloomberg and Kelly From Evicting #OWS

EMERGENCY #OWS EVICTION DEFENSE:
Prevent the forcible closure of Occupy Wall Street

Tell Bloomberg: Don't Foreclose the Occupation.

NEED MASS TURN-OUT, SHOW UP AT MIDNIGHT, NOT 6 A.M.

This is an emergency situation. Please take a minute to read this, and please take action and spread the word far and wide.
Occupy Wall Street is gaining momentum, with occupation actions now happening in cities across the world.
But last night Mayor Bloomberg and the NYPD notified Occupy Wall Street participants about plans to “clean the park”—the site of the Wall Street protests—tomorrow starting at 7am. "Cleaning" was used as a pretext to shut down “Bloombergville” a few months back, and to shut down peaceful occupations elsewhere.
Bloomberg says that the park will be open for public usage following the cleaning, but with a notable caveat: Occupy Wall Street participants must follow the “rules”.
NYPD Police Commissioner Ray Kelly has said that they will move in to clear us and we will not be allowed to take sleeping bags, tarps, personal items or gear back into the park.
This is it—this is their attempt to shut down #OWS for good.

PLEASE TAKE ACTION

1) Call 311 (or +1 (212) NEW-YORK if you're out of town) and tell Bloomberg to support our right to assemble and to not interfere with #OWS.
2) Come to #OWS TONIGHT AT MIDNIGHT to defend the occupation from eviction.
For those of you who plan to help us hold our ground—which we hope will be all of you—make sure you understand the possible consequences. Be prepared to not get much sleep. Be prepared for possible arrest. Make sure your items are together and ready to go (or already out of the park.) We are pursuing all possible strategies; this is a message of solidarity.

I AM NOT MOVING - Occupy Wall Street

This is how your freedoms are taken away... This is how it starts...

Van Jones speaks at #OCCUPYWALLSTREET

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

A Day At Occupy Wall Street

Verso announces 175 layoffs in Sartell


Employees walk across the railroad tracks that run through the Verso Paper Corp. mill in Sartell on Tuesday while a crew works on the tracks. The company announced a permanent force reduction of about 175 workers, amounting to a reduction in paper production of about 103,000 tons per year.


SARTELL — Two of the three machines at Verso Paper’s Sartell mill have been cranking out paper for more than 100 years. Within two months, however, they will go silent, mothballed in a move announced Tuesday that will cut jobs for 175 people at the city’s No. 1 taxpayer and No. 2 employer.

Memphis-based Verso Paper Corp. reported it is cutting annual production capacity by 193,000 tons, including a permanent shutdown of two machines in Sartell effective Dec. 14. The company also announced about 125 layoffs in a coated groundwood paper operation effective Oct. 23 at a mill in Bucksport, Maine.

Keep Northeast Refineries Open

The Petition:
I am a registered voter and taxpayer that supports our local Oil Workers in the Tri State area (Pennsylvania, Delaware and New Jersey). I am extremely concerned about ConocoPhillips closure of their Trainer, Pa refinery in addition to Sunoco Oil Company's announced shutdown of their Philadelphia and Marcus Hook, Pa refineries.

The closing of these 3 refineries will be not only be a devastating blow to those communities and school districts in South Eastern Pa, but the whole Tri-State Area as well. Impact studies show that up to 10 jobs will be impacted for the loss of every 1 refinery job, and with the 2,000 jobs that will be lost immediately with the closure of these plants, that's 20,000 good paying middle class jobs lost, in a time when our economy can least afford it.

sign it here

Layoffs in a matter of days?

NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 10: New York Governor Andrew Cuomo speaks to the media along the route of the 67th annual Columbus Day Parade on October 10, 2011 in New York City.



ALBANY -- If the Public Employees Federation does reach agreement on a "tweaked" labor contract with the state, it will have to be ratified by the union's 56,000 members within eight days to avoid thousands of layoffs.

Both Gov. Andrew Cuomo and union officials affirmed Monday that "conversations are ongoing," but a revised proposal acceptable to both sides has still not congealed. PEF members rejected a tentative five-year deal late last month, prompting the state to begin laying off 3,496 workers and prompting a crash second round of talks.

But even if those talks bear fruit, the state will not rescind layoff notices like it did in July, according to Cuomo's spokesman Josh Vlasto.

Why Is This Congressman Afraid Of OccupyWallStreet?

Peter King (R – NY) knows what people are capable of when we unite and confront power.



Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Liberty Plaza had a visit from Slavoj Zizek






Transcripts
Part One

Conservative Pundits’ Double Standard On Occupy Wall Street And The Tea Party

On Friday, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) dismissed the Occupy Wall Street protests and the growing 99 Percent Movement as a “mob” dividing “Americans against Americans.” Then yesterday on ABC, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) pointed out Cantor’s glaring double standard: When the Tea Party — a similarly grassroots movement claiming the mantle of populism — arose, he happily endorsed it.

In the same vein, Chris Wallace declared on yesterday’s Fox News Sunday that the 99 Percent Movement was getting more coverage “than it deserves.” Of course, Wallace is one of the star hosts of a network that essentially served as the Tea Party movement’s unofficial PR wing, posting dates and times for rallies on its website and promoting Tea Party events during their regular programming.

This double standard of mocking and vilifying the 99 Percent Movement as misguided, irrelevant, or even dangerous, while embracing the Tea Party as a fresh populist cure for the nation’s ills, has been employed universally by the conservative echo changer, with Fox News at its locus. ThinkProgress has the video evidence.


Monday, October 10, 2011

Alan Grayson "I understand exactly why people occupy Wall Street"

The 99 Percent Movement

Emboldened by the inspiring actions of activists who have been protesting in New York City since Sept. 17, thousands and thousands of individuals are flocking to the streets in cities across America to express their disgust and anger with a political and financial system that unjustly rewards the richest 1 percent at the expense of everyone else.
The original “Occupy Wall Street” protest has grown beyond its name — it is no longer solely about the courageous people camped out at Zuccotti Park; it is a nationwide movement bonded by a shared refrain: “We are the 99 percent.” Today, ThinkProgress is launching a new site to cover the 99 Percent Movement, to help explain their grievances and document their successes. Please check it out HERE.


Friday, October 7, 2011

The Big Secret About Who Is Actually Marching On Wall Street

The mainstream media would have you believe the occupation is made solely of kids and hippies.





Thursday, October 6, 2011

Why #OccupyWallStreet? Four Reasons from DC Douglas

It's not a USA thing, It's happening all over the world: Greek State Workers Take to Streets to Fight Cuts

Police fired tear gas at stone-throwing youths in central Athens on Wednesday, where thousands of striking state sector workers marched against cuts the government says are needed to save the nation from bankruptcy.

Greek Labor Unions Strike
AP



A small number of youths broke up marble paving slabs and hurled the chunks of rock at police in full riot gear, who responded by firing tear gas grenades.

Flights were grounded, schools shut and government offices closed in the first nationwide walkout in months. Labor leaders call it the start of a campaign to derail emergency austerity steps launched last month by a government that has already imposed two years of tax hikes and wage cuts.

Greece's debt crisis poses a threat to the viability of the 17-nation euro currency zone. Reforms to Greek finances took on a new urgency this week after the announcement that Athens would miss its 2011 deficit target.

Thousands of state workers, pensioners and students had gathered peacefully, beating drums and waving banners reading "Erase the debt!" and "The rich must pay". They marched into the square outside parliament where lawmakers were debating holding a referendum on the response to the fiscal crisis.

In June, more than 100 people were injured in clashes between demonstrators and police in Syntagma Square. A police official said about 1,000 officers were deploying on Wednesday, fewer than during June's protests.

Hospitals ran on emergency staff and some state schools closed. Trains were halted, and more than 400 international and domestic flights were cancelled at Athens airport, an airport spokeswoman said.

Despite its new measures demanded by the EU and IMF [cnbc explains] , the government was forced to announce this week it would still miss its 2011 deficit target by nearly 2 billion euros, rattling global markets. Polls show nearly four out of five Greeks expect to default on the massive national debt within months.

"We want this government out. They deceived us. They promised to tax the rich and help the poor, but they didn't," said Sotiris Pelekanos, 39, an engineer and one of the striking workers gathered in central Athens.

"I don't care if we go bankrupt. We are already bankrupt. It's just a matter of the state realizing it," he said. "We've lost everything."

Greece's main Labor unions ADEDY and GSEE expect hundreds of thousands of people to walk off the job.

"They are not trying to save Greece. They are just killing workers," ADEDY Vice President Ilias Vrettakos said in a speech during the rally. "They should get the money from the rich, not from us."

Away from the demonstrations, the streets of the capital were calm. The private sector did not participate in the strike but will take part in a bigger general strike on Oct. 19.

Many in the Greek private sector resent the perks of state workers, who make up about a fifth of Greece's work force and are protected from layoffs by the constitution.

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Gov. Chris Christie’s Budget Cuts Put 4,000 New Jersey Police Officers Out Of A Job

By Tanya Somanader on Oct 25, 2011 at 1:50 pm


In the name of “no taxes,” Republicans have slashed state budgets across the country, forcing schools to sell advertising space, firefighters to lose their jobs to prison labor, and cities to decriminalize domestic violence in order to save money.

In New Jersey, Gov. Chris Christie (R) instituted severe cuts to education funding, public employee benefits, and public sector jobs, while calling his action the “day of reckoning.” Christie cut $3 billion in his first two years, leaving low-income New Jerseyans with half the number of legal aid lawyers, the mentally ill without a home after a hospital had to shut down, and thousands of women without health clinics to visit. Those cuts have also left 4,000 New Jersey police officers without a job and left drug-related crime to flourish:

In Newark, police no longer respond to motor vehicle accidents without injuries. In Paterson, the police department’s Narcotics Squad was cut by half.

In Newark, 162 officers were laid off; in Camden, 167; Trenton, 105. [...]

Statewide, about 4,000 police officers have lost their jobs in the past two years, said Anthony Wieners, president of the state’s Policemen’s Benevolent Association. There were about 25,900 municipal police officers in New Jersey in 2009, according to State Police statistics.

“All the advancements we made since the late 1970s, in community policing, getting out into the communities and building a trust, are going to be lost,” Wieners said.

In Little Egg, the police department had to disband its drug unit after 11 of the town’s 49 cops were laid off last year. In the six months that followed the layoffs, “burglaries in the township jumped 61 percent, assaults rose 22 percent, and larceny increased 54 percent.”

Christie’s “day of reckoning” has fallen hard on low-income New Jerseyans and public servants. But, thanks to Christie, the reckoning never reached the state’s millionaires. Last year, the state legislature passed a tax on millionaires that would help alleviate Christie’s budget cuts. Christie vetoed it — twice. In under two minutes flat. His argument: A tax increase is a “failed, irresponsible” policy that will “set our economy further back from recovery.” But it’s hard to see how his current policies are doing anything different.

Saturday, October 1, 2011

Breaking Their Promise To Focus On Job Creation, House GOP Proposes Slashing Job Training Programs

House Republicans yesterday released their draft budget proposal for labor, health, and human service, which in one fell swoop revives the assault on all their favorite bugaboos, including Planned Parenthood, National Public Radio, the National Labor Relations Board, and President Obama’s health care reform law. The GOP also targeted heat subsidies that prevent low-income families from freezing in the winter, and slashed education funding by $2.4 billion. The bill also eliminates the Administration’s “Race to the Top” education reform program and reduces eligibility for Pell Grants for low-income college students.
Perhaps most surprisingly for a party that claims to be focused on job creation, the GOP budget reduces funding for job training programs that give the unemployed the skills they need to find work in an ailing economy:

Employment Training Administration (ETA) – The legislation provides the ETA with $7.5 billion in new discretionary budget authority – $2.2 billion (-23%) below last year’s level and $2.1 billion (-22%) below the President’s request. Much of this reduction is due to the transition of employment and training programs to a federal fiscal year and the elimination of $2.4 billion in advance appropriations for the 2013 fiscal year.
Slashing funding for these training programs by nearly a quarter will deprive thousands of workers of a better chance to find employment. The bill also cuts the Department of Labor’s funding by $2.6 billion and “increases oversight” of job training programs by requiring the GAO to conduct a study on their cost-effectiveness — a transparent pretext for further diminishing the programs. The budget also laughably claims to “foster a pro-job growth environment” through a number of anti-union measures.
The national unemployment rate remains above 9 percent and 25 million Americans are unemployed or can’t find full-time work. Yet this is not the first time congressional Republicans have tried to zero out job training programs.

In February the plan proposed by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-WI) — and approved by almost the entire GOP caucus — gutted federal job training funding by nearly 50 percent. Republicans’ preoccupation with abolishing these programs illustrates that their talk about creating jobs is nothing more than empty rhetoric to conceal a pro-corporate agenda.